How the path to the Democratic presidential nomination is different in 2020

NEW YORK (Reuters) – The Democratic Party will officially nominate a 2020 presidential candidate at its convention next July, but not before a long primary season that kicks off with the Iowa caucuses in February and ends with the Puerto Rican primary in June.

The goal for candidates: Amass on a state-by-state basis the 1,885 delegates needed to be nominated on the first ballot at the convention in Milwaukee. A candidate must get at least 15% of the vote statewide or in an individual congressional district to be awarded delegates.

The nominating contest will be much different this time around after Democrats made changes aimed at increasing participation and ensuring transparency. Here are some key changes explained.

For a graphic on the delegate race, see: tmsnrt.rs/37bDD2f

FEWER CAUCUSES

In 2020, Democrats will hold caucuses in Iowa, Nevada, North Dakota and Wyoming, far fewer than the 18 conducted in states and territories in the 2016 campaign.

Caucuses require voters to attend a meeting for several hours and vote in the open by raising their hand or gathering with fellow supporters. The process has been criticized as undemocratic because it can dampen participation and is subject to intimidation.

The caucus system favors candidates with a strong, active base instead of broader support. U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, for example, significantly outperformed his rival, Hillary Clinton, in caucuses in the 2016 campaign.

The goal for candidates: Amass on a state-by-state basis the 1,885 delegates needed to be nominated on the first ballot at the convention in Milwaukee. A candidate must get at least 15% of the vote statewide or in an individual congressional district to be awarded delegates.

The nominating contest will be much different this time around after Democrats made changes aimed at increasing participation and ensuring transparency. Here are some key changes explained.

For a graphic on the delegate race, see: tmsnrt.rs/37bDD2f

FEWER CAUCUSES

In 2020, Democrats will hold caucuses in Iowa, Nevada, North Dakota and Wyoming, far fewer than the 18 conducted in states and territories in the 2016 campaign.

Caucuses require voters to attend a meeting for several hours and vote in the open by raising their hand or gathering with fellow supporters. The process has been criticized as undemocratic because it can dampen participation and is subject to intimidation.

The caucus system favors candidates with a strong, active base instead of broader support. U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, for example, significantly outperformed his rival, Hillary Clinton, in caucuses in the 2016 campaign.

CALIFORNIA TO PLAY A BIGGER ROLE?

Traditionally, candidates focused on Iowa and New Hampshire in the early parts of the campaign season, hoping a victory in either of those two states – or both – would jumpstart their campaign and clear the field.

But California has moved its 2020 primary from early June to Super Tuesday on March 3. With Texas already on the Super Tuesday calendar, the switch means the nation’s two most populous states – both with large Hispanic populations – will vote on the same day.

Source: Reuters

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this:
A DAILY ROUNDUP OF THE MOST FASCINATING WALL ST, COMPLIANCE AND REGULATORY NEWS.